July 13, 2012

Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation

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The Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation calls Central Arizona’s upper Sonoran Desert home. Located to the northeast of Phoenix within Maricopa County, Arizona, the 40-square mile reservation is a small part of the ancestral territory of the once nomadic Yavapai people, who hunted and gathered food in a vast area of Arizona’s desert lowlands and mountainous Mogollon Rim country. 

Official Tribal Name: Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation

Physical Address:  17661 E. Yavapai Road, Fort McDowell, AZ 85264
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 17779, Fountain Hills, AZ 85269
Phone:  480-837-5121
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Official Website:  http://www.fmyn.org/ 

Recogniton Status: Federally Recognized

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Common Name: Yavapai

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Formerly  Fort McDowell Mohave-Apache Community of the Fort McDowell Indian Reservation, Mohave, Apache, Mohave-Apache

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Region: Southwest

State(s) Today: Arizona

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Confederacy: Apache Nations

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Reservation: Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation Reservation

Created by Executive Order on September 15, 1903. The reservation is a small parcel of land that was formerly the ancestral territory of the once nomadic Yavapai people.
Land Area:  40-square mile
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 About 900.

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Number of Council members:   2 council members, plus executive officers
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