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July 13, 2012

Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians

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The Pomo Indians, who are not one tribe but rather a group of more than 70  different tribes, have ties to the Alexander Valley, located along the Russian River between Healdsburg and Cloverdale in northern California, that date back as far as 12,000 years ago. Some of the descendants of these early inhabitants are now members of the  Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians.

Official Tribal Name: Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians

Address:  3250 Highway 128 East,  P.O. Box 607 Geyserville, CA 95441
Phone: 707-431-4090
Fax:  707 857-3794
Email: loril@drycreekrancheria.com

Official Website: drycreekrancheria.com 

Recognition Status: Federally Recognized

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Formerly known as the Dry Creek Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California
Pomo Indians
California Indians
Rancheria Indians

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Region: California

State(s) Today: California

Traditional Territory:

The Alexander Valley, located along the Russian River between Healdsburg and Cloverdale in northern California.

Confederacy: Pomo

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Reservation: Dry Creek Rancheria
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The Pomo Indians were known for their intricate basketry used for food gathering and storage, and for household items such as baby cradles.

Tribal members also designed ornate jewelry for tribal celebrations and used the pieces as a means for trade. In addition to jewelry, shaped clamshells were  produced as a source of money and were traded.

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Tribal members also designed ornate jewelry for tribal celebrations and used the pieces as a means for trade. In addition to jewelry, shaped clamshells were produced as a source of money and were traded. Perhaps it was this affinity for trading that attracted the migrating Russians.

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Historically, the Pomo Indians had a rich and affluent culture. The Pomo Indians were hunter/gatherers who relied on several hundred regional plants and animals for food, with their  primary harvest being acorns.

Economy Today:

Casino profits are helping the Tribe provide its people with a better quality of  life while restoring their rich cultural heritage. New opportunities are  becoming available for the Tribe that once were unimaginable. The Pomo are now  able to provide better housing for tribal members, generate funding for improved education and invest in the future of their youth by  assisting in college educations, as well as sustaining better elder care and  child health care.

Additionally, the tribe has committed to  making a positive impact in the local community – enhancing the economy by  providing jobs, supporting local organizations and working with agencies to  improve local infrastructure. By capitalizing on the casino’s available  resources the tribe has been able to donate to local schools and fire  departments and maintains long lasting relationships with their neighbors

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