Tribal Timelines

Tribal Timelines

Cayuga Timeline

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January 10, 2017

The Cayuga are one of the tribes of the Iroquois Confederacy in New York state. Here is a timeline of important events in their history.

Tribal Timelines

WintunTimeline

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January 8, 2017

The traditional location of the Wintun Tribe (aka Wetu) was in the Greater Sacramento Valley in California. Here is a timeline of important events that impacted their history.

Tribal Timelines
February 29, 2016

An atrocity called an “Indian massacre” is a specific incident wherein a group of people (military, mob or other) deliberately kill a significant number of relatively defenseless or innocent people—usually civilian noncombatants or to the summary execution of prisoners-of-war. Here is a timeline of significant massacres that occurred in the United States between 1539 and 1911.

Tribal Timelines
September 16, 2015

The Chippewa peoples were in North America over 11,000 years before Columbus “discovered” the Americas. Here is a timeline of their history beginning in 1492.

Tribal Timelines

Odawa Timeline

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August 3, 2015

In the beginning there was the Anishnabek. The Origin story. How we became the Odawa. The Odawa along with the Ojibwa and Potawatomi formed an alliance and became known as the Three Fires. Here is our Odawa timeline.              1600’s-1640’s        The Iroquois Wars that drove the Odawa from Manitoulin Island and almost annihilated them. 1600’s-1800’s […]

Tribal Timelines
July 4, 2014

The Catawba tribe traditionally lived aAlong the banks of the Catawba River in North and South Carolina. Today, they have a 640-acre reservation near Rock Hill, South Carolina. This tribe was federally recognized in 1993. Here is a timeline of important events in their history.

Tribal Timelines
March 18, 2014

The Acolapissa were Choctaw speaking hunter/farmers of the lower Mississippi River in Louisiana.  They occupied the Natchitoches for some time, having a battle upon their separation.  After decimation by a smallpox epidemic, and having suffered a slaving raid by the British and Chickasaw, this tribe allied with the French. 

Tribal Timelines
March 18, 2014

The Achomawi (Pit River Indians) were semi-sedentary hunter/ gatherer tribes located in the drainage of the Pit River in northeastern California. They were often called the Pit River Indians due to their practice of digging pits for the purpose of catching game. The tribes were often victims of slaving raids of tribes from the north and later were devastated by settlers in the years following the gold rush.

Tribal Timelines
March 18, 2014
The Crow (ABSAROKE OR ABSALOOKE)  were sedentary hunter/farmers until they separated from the Hidatsa in two groups about A.D. 1400 and 1600.  Upon separation, they became nomadic hunter/gatherers of the northern Plains.  In historic times, they ranged from the valley of the Yellowstone in southern Montana south as far as the Laramie fork of the Platte in Wyoming.  They were constantly in conflict with most of their neighbors and severely outnumbered. Here is a timeline of important events in their history.

Tribal Timelines
March 18, 2014

The Abenaki were a woodland hunter/ farmer confederacy who’s tradition states that they migrated from the Southwest. They ranged throughout southwestern Maine into Vermont and New Hampshire. Early contact was with the British, but the tribe was missionized and allied with the French. They ranged throughout southwestern Maine into Vermont and New Hampshire. Early contact was with the British, but the tribe was missionized and allied with the French.

Tribal Timelines
December 6, 2013

200 B.C. – The Omahas Are Descendants of the Eastern Woodland.

In 200 B.C. many groups of people lived in North America. We call the peoples living in eastern and east central North America the woodland culture. Other people lived across the continent including the Southwest, West and Atlantic Coast.

In the area we call today eastern and northeastern Nebraska eventually became the lands of the Omaha and Ponca. The ancestors of the Omaha and Ponca came from the eastern woodland.

Tribal Timelines
July 1, 2013

Indian Wars timeline from 1866-1898. Includes tribes involved, battle name, and causes. This era included Red Cloud’s War, the Washita Massacre, Marias Massacre, Custer’s Last Stand, the Nez Perce War, and the Wounded Knee Massacre, among others.

Tribal Timelines
July 1, 2013

Indian Wars Timeline 1855-1865, including tribes involved, causes and effects. This era included the third Seminole War, the California Indian wars, Navajo wars, Apache wars, Sioux and Cheyenne wars, and the massacres of Bear River and Sand Creek, among others.

Tribal Timelines
July 1, 2013

Indian Wars Timeline – a list of major battles or indian wars from 1800 to 1864, the tribes involved, and their causes. This era included the Battle of Tippecanoe, the first and second Seminole Wars, and wars with the Arikara, Sioux, Creek, Winnebago, Cherokee, Osage, Comanche, and others. 

Tribal Timelines
May 2, 2013

12,000-9,000 B.C.  Sites have been found indicating Paleo-Indian habitation within the Great Basin. They were small hunting groups following the mammoth, bison, camel and horse herds. 

9,000 B.C – 400 A.D.  Implements found in this area from this “Great Basin Desert Archaic Period” include milling stones.

3,000 B.C.  The lives of the oldest bristlecone pine trees in the Great Basin National Park began.

500-800 A.D.  The Fremont Culture emerged, leaving behind well-preserved sites indicating agricultural activity as well as hunting and gathering.

Tribal Timelines
March 19, 2013

The largest and oldest histories of Montana Tribes are still very much oral histories and remain in the collective memories of individuals. Some of that history has been lost, but much remains vibrant within community stories and narratives that have yet to be documented. This is a brief timeline of the Chippewa and Cree Tribes and the Rocky’s Boy Reservation.

Tribal Timelines
March 19, 2013

The largest and oldest histories of Montana Tribes are still very much oral histories and remain in the collective memories of individuals. Some of that history has been lost, but much remains vibrant within community stories and narratives that have yet to be documented.This is a brief timeline of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe and the Norther Cheyenne Reservation.

Tribal Timelines
March 19, 2013

The largest and oldest histories of Montana Tribes are still very much oral histories and remain in the collective memories of individuals. Some of that history has been lost, but much remains vibrant within community stories and narratives that have yet to be documented. This is a brief Souix and Assiniboine Tribes and Fort Peck Reservation Timeline.

Tribal Timelines
March 19, 2013

The largest and oldest histories of Montana Tribes are still very much oral
histories and remain in the collective memories of individuals. Some of that history has been lost, but much remains vibrant within community stories and narratives that have yet to be documented. This is a brief timeline of the Assiniboine and Gros Ventre tribes and the Fort Belknap Reservation.

Tribal Timelines
March 19, 2013

The largest and oldest histories of Montana Tribes are still very much oral histories and remain in the collective memories of individuals. Some of that history has been lost, but much remains vibrant within community stories and narratives that have yet to be documented. This is a brief timeline of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribes and the Flathead Reservation.

Tribal Timelines
March 19, 2013

The largest and oldest histories of Montana Tribes are still very much oral histories and remain in the collective memories of individuals. Some of that history has been lost, but much remains vibrant within community stories and narratives that have yet to be documented. Here is a brief tribal timeline for the Blackfeet tribe and the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana.

Tribal Timelines
March 19, 2013

The largest and oldest histories of Montana Tribes are still very much oral histories and remain in the collective memories of individuals. Some of that history has been lost, but much remains vibrant within community stories and narratives that have yet to be documented. Here is a brief timeline of important events in the history of the Crow Tribe.

Tribal Timelines
November 16, 2012

This Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa timeline covers the period from 1300 to 1997. Originally Eastern Woodland Indians, the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa migrated to the Great Plains and adopted the Plains lifestyle in the early 1800s.

Tribal Timelines
October 4, 2012

After hundreds of years of archaeological research by experts, and gathering of artifacts from many hundreds of Southern California indigenous sites, it is widely accepted that today’s Kumeyaay tribal members can trace their lineage back to at least 12,000 years in the San Diego area – that’s 600 generations.

Tribal Timelines
July 24, 2012

According to oral traditions, the Ojibwe first lived on the Atlantic coast of North America. About 500 years ago, the ancestors of the Mille Lacs Band began migrating west. By the mid-1700s, the Ojibwe had established themselves in the region around Mille Lacs Lake in what is today East Central Minnesota. Read on for a timeline of important events in the history of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe Indians.

Tribal Timelines
July 2, 2008

The 1933 appeal of prohibition did not apply to native americans. They continued under prohibition laws until 1953, when President Dwight D. Eisenhower Indian prohibition was repealed country-wide. Indian reservations, however, remained dry unless they opted to permit the possession and sale of alcohol on the reservation. Many reservations remain “dry” today.

Tribal Timelines
January 30, 2005

History of the Anishinabeg (Ojibwe) people.. KEYWORDS: anishinabeg history anishinabe history ojibwe history ojibwa history ojibway history chipewa history chippewa history The origin of the Anishinabeg begins in this way: “The Great Spirit once made a bird, and he sent it from the skies to make it’s abobe on Earth. The bird came, and when […]

Tribal Timelines
November 26, 2004

The center of the Aztec civilization was the Valley of Mexico, a huge, oval basin about 7,500 feet above sea level. The Aztec empire included many cities and towns, especially in the Valley of Mexico. The largest city in the empire was the capital, Tenochtitlan.

The early settlers built log rafts, then covered them with mud and planted seeds to create roots and develop more solid land for building homes in this marshy land. Canals were also cut out through the marsh so that a typical Aztec home had its back to a canal with a canoe tied at the door.

Tribal Timelines